Eat well, exercise more: New global guidelines to reduce risk of dementia – CNN

image(CNN) There’s no effective treatment for dementia, which affects 50 million people worldwide, but the World Health Organization says there’s much can be done to delay or slow the onset and progression of the disease.
In guidelines released Tuesday, WHO issued its first recommendations to reduce the risk of dementia globally. They include regular physical exercise, not using tobacco, drinking less alcohol, maintaining healthy blood pressure and eating a healthy diet — particularly a Mediterranean one. The international health body also warned against taking dietary supplements such as vitamins B and E in an effort to combat cognitive decline and dementia. “While some people are unlucky and inherit a combination of genes that makes it highly likely they will develop dementia, many people have the opportunity to substantially reduce their risk by living a healthy lifestyle,” professor Tara Spires-Jones, UK Dementia Research Institute program lead and deputy director of the Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, told the Science Media Center. Mediterranean diet: How to start (and stay on) one of the world’s healthiest diets “The WHO has looked at the available evidence and made recommendations that some lifestyle changes, in particular increasing exercise before any cognitive symptoms are present, can reduce dementia risk,” she added. Read More “Other recommendations have a less strong evidence base but may have evidence that they do not increase risk or harm and can therefore be recommended safely, although their impact on risk is less certain.

” WHO said there are 10 million new cases of dementia every year, and this figure is set to triple by 2050.

The disease is a major cause of disability and dependency among older people and “can devastate the lives of affected individuals, their carers and families,” the organization said. The disease also exacts a heavy economic toll, with the cost of caring for people with dementia estimated to rise to $2 trillion annually by 2030, according to WHO. What will and won’t help The 78-page report outlined what WHO believes will — and won’t — help reduce the risk of dementia, which has been described by campaigners as the biggest health challenge of our generation. It recommended physical activity, stopping smoking, consuming less alcohol and a healthy, balanced diet.

In particular, it says that committing to a Mediterranean diet (simple plant-based cooking, little meat and a heavy emphasis on olive oil) could help. Doctors newly define another type of dementia, sometimes mistaken for Alzheimer’s “The Mediterranean diet is the most extensively studied dietary approach, in general as well as in relation to cognitive function,” the report said. “Several systematic reviews of observational studies have concluded that high adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with decreased risk of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease, but modest adherence is not.” The report recommended proper management of weight, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia — unhealthy or unbalanced cholesterol levels — as measures that could potentially reduce the risk of dementia and cognitive decline.

Although the report stressed that social participation and social support are strongly connected to good health and individual well-being, it said there was insufficient evidence linking social activity with a reduced of risk of dementia. Friends and family may help Italians live healthier and longer Similarly, it said cognitive training could be offered to older adults but the evidence linking it to a lower risk of dementia was “very low to low.

” The report also warned against using supplements such as B vitamins, antioxidants, omega-3 and ginkgo. “The negative recommendation, advocating that people do not use vitamin or dietary supplements (unless they are needed for a clinical problem) is welcome, and it is to be hoped that it saves lots of people from wasting their money,” said professor Tom Dening, director of the Centre for Old Age and Dementia, Institute of Mental Health at the University of Nottingham.

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Experts said that the advice issued by WHO was comprehensive and sensible, but some cautioned that the evidence that these steps would reduce dementia risk was not always strong. “Keep on doing the things that we know benefit overall physical and mental health, but understand that the evidence that these steps will reduce dementia risk is not strong,” Robert Howard, a professor of old age psychiatry at University College London, told the Science Media Center.

“Like many colleagues, I already tell my patients that what is good for their hearts is probably good for their brains.”.

Adopting a healthy lifestyle helps reduce the risk of dementia

image14 May 2019 – People can reduce their risk of dementia by getting regular exercise, not smoking, avoiding harmful use of alcohol, controlling their weight, eating a healthy diet, and maintaining healthy blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels, according to new guidelines issued by the World Health Organization (WHO) today.
“In the next 30 years, the number of people with dementia is expected to triple,” said “We need to do everything we can to reduce our risk of dementia. The scientific evidence gathered for these Guidelines confirm what we have suspected for some time, that what is good for our heart, is also good for our brain.”
The Guidelines provide the knowledge base for health-care providers to advise patients on what they can do to help prevent cognitive decline and dementia.

They will also be useful for governments, policy-makers and planning authorities to guide them in developing policy and designing programmes that encourage healthy lifestyles.

The reduction of risk factors for dementia is one of several areas of action included in WHO’s Global action plan for the public health response to dementia .

Other areas include: strengthening information systems for dementia; diagnosis, treatment and care; supporting carers of people with dementia; and research and innovation.
WHO’s Global Dementia Observatory, launched in December 2017, is a compilation of information about country activities and resources for dementia, such as national plans, dementia-friendly initiatives, awareness campaigns and facilities for care.

Data from 21 countries, including Bangladesh, Chile, France, Japan, Jordan and Togo, have already been included, with a total of 80 countries now engaged in providing data.
Creating national policies and plans for dementia are among WHO’s key recommendations for countries in their efforts to manage this growing health challenge. During 2018, WHO provided support to countries such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Qatar, Slovenia and Sri Lanka to help them develop a comprehensive, multi-sectoral public health response to dementia.
An essential element of every national dementia plan is support for carers of people with dementia, said Dr Dévora Kestel, Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse at WHO.

“Dementia carers are very often family members who need to make considerable adjustments to their family and professional lives to care for their loved ones. This is why WHO created iSupport. iSupport is an online training programme providing carers of people with dementia with advice on overall management of care, dealing with behaviour changes and how to look after their own health.”
iSupport is currently being used in eight countries, with more expected to follow.
Dementia: a rapidly growing public health problem
Dementia is an illness characterized by a deterioration in cognitive function beyond what might be expected from normal ageing. It affects memory, thinking, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language and judgement.

Dementia results from a variety of diseases and injuries that affect the brain, such as Alzheimer disease or stroke.
Dementia is a rapidly growing public health problem affecting around 50 million people globally.

There are nearly 10 million new cases every year. Dementia is a major cause of disability and dependency among older people. Additionally, the disease inflicts a heavy economic burden on societies as a whole, with the costs of caring for people with dementia estimated to rise to US$ 2 trillion annually by 2030..

The truth behind five ‘superfoods’

image4 minutes to read It’s been claimed resveratrol protects our cells from damage and reduces the risk of a range of conditions such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and heart disease. There is some limited evidence that resveratrol has benefits in animal models, although studies done in humans have not shown a similar effect. It varies by wine, but red wine contains about 3 micrograms (about 3 millionths of a gram) of resveratrol per bottle. The studies that have shown a benefit from resveratrol use at least 0.1 grams per day (that’s 100,000 micrograms). To get that much resveratrol, you’d have to drink roughly 200 bottles of wine a day. We can probably all agree that’s not very healthy. Blueberries Blueberries, like red wine, are a source of resveratrol, but at a few micrograms per berry you’d have to eat more than 10,000 berries a day to get the active dose.

Blueberries also contain compounds called anthocyanins, which may improve some markers of heart disease. But to get an active dose there you’re looking at 150-300 blueberries per day. More reasonable, but still quite a lot of fruit – and expensive. A pile of white, milk and dark chocolate. Photo / Getty Chocolate The news that dark chocolate lowers blood pressure is always well-received. Theobromine, a chemical in chocolate has been shown to lower blood pressure in doses of about 1 gram of the active compound, but not at lower doses.

Depending on the chocolate, you could be eating 100g of dark chocolate before you reached this dose. Chocolate is a discretionary food, or “junk food”.

The recommended serve for discretionary foods is no more than 600 kilojoules per day, or 25g of chocolate. Eating 100g of chocolate would be equivalent to more than 2,000kJ. Excess kilojoule consumption leads to weight gain, and being overweight increases risk of heart disease and stroke. So these risks would likely negate the benefits of eating chocolate to lower your blood pressure. Turmeric Turmeric is a favourite. It’s good in curries, and recently we’ve seen hype around the tumeric latte. Stories pop up regularly about its healing power, normally based on curcumin. Curcumin refers to a group of compounds, called curcuminoids, that might have some health benefits, like reducing inflammation.

Inflammation helps us to fight infections and respond to injuries, but too much inflammation is a problem in diseases like arthritis, and might be linked to other conditions like heart disease or stroke. Human trials on curcumin have been inconclusive, but most use curcumin supplementation in very large doses of 1 to 12 grams per day. Turmeric is about 3% curcumin, so for each gram of tumeric you eat you only get 0.03g of curcumin.

This means you’d have to eat more than 30g of tumeric to get the minimum active dose of tumeric. Importantly, curcumin in turmeric is not very bioavailable.

This means we only absorb about 25 per cent of what we eat, so you might actually have to eat well over 100g of turmeric, every day, to get a reasonable dose of curcumin. That’s a lot of curry. What to eat then? We all want food to heal us, but focusing on single foods and eating mounds of them is not the answer. Instead, a balanced and diverse diet can provide foods each with a range of different nutrients and bioactive compounds. Don’t get distracted by quick fixes; focus instead on enjoying a variety of foods.

• Emma Beckett is from the School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle • Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz is based in the Hunter New England Local Health District Herald recommends.

10 Powerful Ways to Master Self-Discipline

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Personal Development 10 Powerful Ways to Master Self-Discipline Like everything else that brings progress, the greatest struggle is always within ourselves. That’s why you need to learn self-discipline. 7 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
It may be hard to believe when you’re facing a hot-fudge sundae or the prospect of sleeping in versus hitting the gym, but studies show that people with self-discipline are happier.

People with a higher degree of self-control spend less time debating whether to indulge in behaviors that are detrimental to their health, and are able to make positive decisions more easily. They don’t let impulses or feelings dictate their choices.

Instead, they make level-headed decisions. As a result, they tend to feel more satisfied with their lives.

There are things you can do to learn self-discipline and gain the willpower to live a happier life. If you are looking to take control of your habits and choices, here are the 10 most powerful things you can do to master self-discipline. 1. Know your weaknesses.

We all have weaknesses .

Whether they’re snacks such as potato chips or chocolate chip cookies, or technology such as Facebook or the latest addictive game app, they have similar effects on us.
Acknowledge your shortcomings, whatever they may be. Too often people either try to pretend their vulnerabilities don’t exist or cover up any pitfalls in their lives.

Own up to your flaws. You can’t overcome them until you do.
Related: 8 Ways to Create the Discipline Habit 2. Remove temptations.
Like the saying goes, “out of sight, out of mind.” It may seem silly, but this phrase offers powerful advice.

By simply removing your biggest temptations from your environment, you will greatly improve your self-discipline.
If you want to eat healthier , don’t buy junk food. If you want to improve your productivity at work , turn off notifications and silence your cell phone. The fewer distractions you have, the more focused you will be on accomplishing your goals. Set yourself up for success by ditching bad influences. 3.

Set clear goals and have an execution plan.
If you hope to achieve self-discipline, you must have a clear vision of what you hope to accomplish. You must also have an understanding of what success means to you. After all, if you don’t know where you are going, it’s easy to lose your way or get sidetracked.
A clear plan outlines each step you must take in order to reach your goals. Figure out who you are and what you are about.

Create a mantra to keep yourself focused. Successful people use this technique to stay on track and establish a clear finish line. 4. Build your self-discipline.
We aren’t born with self-discipline — it’s a learned behavior. And just like any other skill you want to master, it requires daily practice and repetition. Just like going to the gym, willpower and self-discipline take a lot of work.

The effort and focus that self-discipline requires can be draining.
As time passes, it can become more and more difficult to keep your willpower in check. The bigger the temptation or decision, the more challenging it can feel to tackle other tasks that also require self-control. So work on building your self-discipline through daily diligence.
Related: 7 Ways to Gain Self Discipline and Strive Towards Greatness 5.

Create new habits by keeping it simple.
Acquiring self-discipline and working to instill a new habit can feel daunting at first, especially if you focus on the entire task at hand.

To avoid feeling intimidated, keep it simple. Break your goal into small, doable steps. Instead of trying to change everything at once, focus on doing one thing consistently and master self-discipline with that goal in mind.
If you’re trying to get in shape, start by working out 10 or 15 minutes a day. If you’re trying to achieve better sleep habits, start by going to bed 15 minutes earlier each night. If you want to eat healthier, start by prepping lunch the night before to take with you in the morning. Take baby steps.

Eventually, when you’re ready, you can add more goals to your list. 6. Eat often and healthy.

The feeling of being hangry — that angry, annoyed, irritated sensation you get when you’re hungry — is real and can have a substantial impact on willpower. Research has proven that low blood sugar often weakens a person’s resolve, making you grumpy and pessimistic.
When you’re hungry, your ability to concentrate suffers and your brain doesn’t function as well. Your self-control is likely weakened in all areas, including diet, exercise, work and relationships.

So fuel up with healthy snacks and regular meals to keep yourself in check. 7.

Change your perception about willpower.
According to a study by Stanford University , the amount of willpower a person has is determined by their beliefs. If you believe you have a limited amount of willpower, you probably won’t surpass those limits. If you don’t place a limit on your self-control, you are less likely to exhaust yourself before meeting your goals.
In short, it may be that our internal conceptions about willpower and self-control determine how much of them we have. If you can remove these subconscious obstacles and truly believe you can do it, then you will give yourself an extra boost of motivation toward making those goals a reality. 8. Give yourself a backup plan.

Psychologists use a technique to boost willpower called “implementation intention.” That’s when you give yourself a plan to deal with a potentially difficult situation you know you will likely face. For instance, imagine that you’re working on eating healthier, but you’re on your way to a party where food will be served.
Before you go, tell yourself that instead of diving into a plate of cheese and crackers, you will sip a glass of water and focus on mingling. Going in with a plan will help give you the mindset and the self-control necessary for the situation. You will also save energy by not having to make a sudden decision based on your emotional state. 9. Reward yourself.

Give yourself something to be excited about by planning a reward when you accomplish your goals. Just like when you were a little kid and got a treat for good behavior, having something to look forward to gives you the motivation to succeed.

Anticipation is powerful. It gives you something to obsess over and focus on, so you’re not only thinking of what you are trying to change. And when you achieve your goal, find a new goal and a new reward to keep yourself moving forward. 10. Forgive yourself and move forward.
Even with all of our best intentions and well-laid plans, we sometimes fall short.

It happens. You will have ups and downs, great successes and dismal failures . The key is to keep moving forward.
If you stumble, acknowledge what caused it and move on. Don’t let yourself get wrapped up in guilt, anger or frustration, because these emotions will only drag you further down and impede future progress. Learn from your missteps and forgive yourself.

Then get your head back in the game and refocus on your goals. More from Entrepreneur Jon Horowitz is dedicated to helping brands with grow their social footprint by aligning with influencers and creating innovative content..

Exercise, not pills, better at preventing dementia

imageIf you want to save your brain, focus on keeping the rest of your body well with exercise and healthy habits rather than popping vitamin pills, new guidelines for preventing dementia advise.
About 50 million people currently have dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type. Each year brings 10 million new cases, says the report released Tuesday by the World Health Organization.
Although age is the top risk factor, “dementia is not a natural or inevitable consequence of aging,” it says.
Many health conditions and behaviours affect the odds of developing it, and research suggests that a third of cases are preventable, said Maria Carrillo, chief science officer of the Alzheimer’s Association, which has published similar advice.
Since dementia is currently incurable and so many experimental therapies have failed, focusing on prevention may “give us more benefit in the shorter term,” Carrillo said.

The Goods What is dementia? A primer on this complex condition Smoking linked to higher dementia risk Much of the WHO’s advice is common sense, and echoes what the U.S. National Institute on Aging says.
That includes getting enough exercise; treating other health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol; having an active social life, and avoiding or curbing harmful habits such as smoking, overeating and drinking too much alcohol. Evidence is weak that some of these help preserve thinking skills, but they’re known to aid general health, the WHO says.
Eating well, and possibly following a Mediterranean-style diet, may help prevent dementia, the guidelines say.

But they take a firm stance against vitamin B or E pills, fish oil or multi-complex supplements that are promoted for brain health because there’s strong research showing they don’t work.
“There is currently no evidence to show that taking these supplements actually reduces the risk of cognitive decline and dementia, and in fact, we know that in high doses these can be harmful,” said the WHO’s Dr. Neerja Chowdhary.

“People should be looking for these nutrients through food .

.. not through supplements,” Carrillo agreed.
Video Balancing risky behaviour, independence is goal of innovative seniors care home ‘Every life should have joy, including lives with dementia’ The WHO also did not endorse games and other activities aimed at boosting thinking skills. These can be considered for people with normal capacities or mild impairment, but there’s low to very low evidence of benefit.
There’s not enough evidence to recommend antidepressants to reduce dementia risk although they may be used to treat depression, the report says. Hearing aids also may not reduce dementia risk, but older people should be screened for hearing loss and treated accordingly.

There was substantial evidence that there were things people could do to reduce the risks, Carrillo said.
“Start now. It’s never too late or too early to incorporate healthy habits.”.

Exercise, not pills, better at preventing dementia | CBC News

imageIf you want to save your brain, focus on keeping the rest of your body well with exercise and healthy habits rather than popping vitamin pills, new guidelines for preventing dementia advise.
About 50 million people currently have dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type. Each year brings 10 million new cases, says the report released Tuesday by the World Health Organization.
Although age is the top risk factor, “dementia is not a natural or inevitable consequence of aging,” it says.

Many health conditions and behaviours affect the odds of developing it, and research suggests that a third of cases are preventable, said Maria Carrillo, chief science officer of the Alzheimer’s Association, which has published similar advice.
Since dementia is currently incurable and so many experimental therapies have failed, focusing on prevention may “give us more benefit in the shorter term,” Carrillo said.
The Goods What is dementia? A primer on this complex condition Smoking linked to higher dementia risk Much of the WHO’s advice is common sense, and echoes what the U.

S. National Institute on Aging says.
That includes getting enough exercise; treating other health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol; having an active social life, and avoiding or curbing harmful habits such as smoking, overeating and drinking too much alcohol. Evidence is weak that some of these help preserve thinking skills, but they’re known to aid general health, the WHO says.
Eating well, and possibly following a Mediterranean-style diet, may help prevent dementia, the guidelines say. But they take a firm stance against vitamin B or E pills, fish oil or multi-complex supplements that are promoted for brain health because there’s strong research showing they don’t work.
“There is currently no evidence to show that taking these supplements actually reduces the risk of cognitive decline and dementia, and in fact, we know that in high doses these can be harmful,” said the WHO’s Dr.

Neerja Chowdhary.
“People should be looking for these nutrients through food … not through supplements,” Carrillo agreed.
Video Balancing risky behaviour, independence is goal of innovative seniors care home ‘Every life should have joy, including lives with dementia’ The WHO also did not endorse games and other activities aimed at boosting thinking skills.

These can be considered for people with normal capacities or mild impairment, but there’s low to very low evidence of benefit.
There’s not enough evidence to recommend antidepressants to reduce dementia risk although they may be used to treat depression, the report says. Hearing aids also may not reduce dementia risk, but older people should be screened for hearing loss and treated accordingly.
There was substantial evidence that there were things people could do to reduce the risks, Carrillo said.
“Start now. It’s never too late or too early to incorporate healthy habits.

“.

Dementia: Exercise, diet, healthy lifestyle can prevent it, WHO says

imageLet friends in your social network know what you are reading about Facebook Email Here’s how to prevent dementia, according to new world health guidelines Eat well, exercise often and no need to take some of those vitamins, the World Health Organization said in new guidelines on reducing dementia risks. Post to Facebook Here’s how to prevent dementia, according to new world health guidelines Eat well, exercise often and no need to take some of those vitamins, the World Health Organization said in new guidelines on reducing dementia risks. Check out this story on lcsun-news.com: https://www.

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Cancer con-artist Belle Gibson outed over gambling, still owes $432k

image4 minutes to read “We have a verbal agreement that he will pay half and I will pay half but I’m not always able to do that,” she said. Asked whether she knows how much she owes her partner, she said “there is no record as such”. Gibson’s lawyer objected to a line of questioning from prosecutors after Ms Nikou Madalin asked Gibson whether she “owns all the clothes” she wore today and “can you tell me the labels?” More than 300,000 sufferers made purchases from her before the fake cancer story emerged in 2015. Photo / Facebook Mr Tragardh said the questions were “absurd” and “absolutely extraordinary”. Ms Nikou Madalin said the questions about the labels Gibson wears help her understand exactly where her money is being spent.

Gibson said she could not be sure whether she received any money for sponsored posts on Instagram, both for her personal account or for the Whole Pantry account.

Gibson said she did not know and had “not familiarised myself with the business”. She was asked whether 60 Minutes paid her $AU75,000 for an interview.

She said she did not remember the exact amount she was paid, but that the entire amount was exhausted on legal fees. Gibson told the court she has $50 available to her and “between $1800 and $2000” in cryptocurrency. Earlier, Gibson, 27, was swamped by reporters and photographers as she walked into the Federal Court building in Melbourne to explain why she has failed to pay a single cent of the fine issued in 2017. Gibson wore a black trench coat and a long black skirt with glasses.

Her hair was tied back in a bun as she sat behind her lawyer. Andrew Tragardh, representing Gibson, handed over two years worth of his client’s bank statements for the court to examine and said Gibson does not have enough money to afford ongoing legal fees. “Significantly, my client does not have unlimited resources,” he told the court. He also said lawyers for Consumer Affairs Victoria were subjecting the cancer conwoman to “unnecessary stress” by refusing to examine the documents in court today and asking for an adjournment so they can be “forensically” examined overnight. Mr Tragardh called the request “highly unacceptable”. “Ms Gibson has done everything she’s been asked to do,” he said.

Elle Nikou Madalin, appearing on behalf of Consumer Affairs, said Gibson “may not want to face the media again” but that the stress it causes her is “secondary”. During a break outside court, Gibson was overheard by reporters saying it’s “sad” that media are covering her case and that other “more important” cases should be covered instead. The self-described wellness guru, who lied about her terminal brain cancer diagnosis to dupe Australians out of more than $AU578,000 ($NZD 609,000), was found guilty of five breaches of consumer laws. She made the money via the Whole Pantry cookbook and app after telling consumers she had been cured of cancer by healthy eating. More than 300,000 sufferers made purchases from her before the fake cancer story emerged in 2015. Although Gibson received hundreds of thousands of dollars from sales of her app and book, she only donated about $10,000 to charity.

Justice Debra Mortimer told Gibson in September she had a “relentless obsession with herself”. In November, Justice Mortimer issued a warning to Gibson that failure to pay the penalty would make her liable for jail, property seizures or other punishment. Earlier this year, A Current Affair revealed that Gibson treated herself to luxury trip to East Africa. “Don’t you think it’s more important to be paying back that fine rather than going on an overseas trip?” a reporter asked Gibson upon her return to Australia. The 27-year-old smirked and walked towards her car. The matter has been adjourned until June 6. Gibson is required to attend on that date. Herald recommends.

Study: Half of Americans use swimming pools as communal bathtub

imageSummer is almost here, and one of the ways to stay out of the heat is to take a dip in the pool. But how clean is the water?
According to a new survey presented by the Water Quality and Health Council, 51% of Americans reported using a swimming pool as a communal bathtub — using the pool as an alternative to showering or rinsing off after engaging in exercise or yard work. Even though 64% of Americans know pool chemicals don’t eliminate the need to shower, people continue to do it anyway.
“When dirt, sweat, personal care products, and other things on our bodies react with chlorine, there is less chlorine available to kill germs,” said Dr. Chris Wiant, chair of the Water Quality & Health Council. “Rinsing off for just 1 minute removes most of the dirt, sweat, or anything else on your body.”
The 2019 Healthy Pools survey, released Tuesday, was conducted online by Sachs Media Group and measured perceptions and behaviors related to swimming pools and public health.

The organization interviewed 3,100 Americans adults on April 12 and 13. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.7% at the 95% confidence level and was nationally representative of American adults in terms of age, race, gender, income and region.

‘A pathogen soup’: Mom files $1 million lawsuit after brain-eating amoeba at Texas water park kills son
Why you need to shower: Here’s what would happen if you didn’t shower for a year?
The survey comes as experts from the council, the U.S.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Pool and Hot Tub Alliance work to educate the public on healthy and safe swimming.
Along with not showering before entering a pool, 40% of Americans admitted they have peed in the pool as an adult.

Urine reacts with chlorine, reducing the amount of chemicals available to kill germs.
The survey also revealed that 24% of Americans would go in a pool within one hour of having diarrhea, and 48% reported that they never shower before swimming.

Most people did not know that pool chemistry can be impacted by personal care items such as makeup (53%) and deodorant (55%).
To check the chlorine and pH levels for a personal or public pool, the council is offering free pool tests kits through its 15th annual Healthy Pools campaign on its website. In addition, the agency is urging people to check local and state health departments for pool inspection records. While the records for several states are available on the council’s website, Michigan is not on the list.

But there’s hope that records will be more readily available for public inspection in the near future, according to the state.

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy, formerly the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, said in a statement:
“Data on Michigan swimming pool inspections is available through open records requests with the state. EGLE currently is working through the bid process for an IT solution that would help make this information more readily available.”
“Pools are great places to have fun with friends and family,” said Jim Mock, interim executive director of the Pool and Hot Tub Alliance. “A trained pool operator can get the mix of pool chemicals healthy and safe, and swimmers can help keep it right by swimming healthy.


Are beards dirtier than dogs?: ‘Significantly’ more germs hide in men’s beards, study finds
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Follow Micah Walker on Twitter: @Micah_walker701
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